How Rio Helped Sharon and Now Needs Our Help

Four years ago, Sharon’s life was dramatically changed by a young Hungarian Vizla. Rio is a service dog trained to handle diabetes. Sharon used to rely on a motorized chair for her mobility but, thanks to Rio, she’s able to walk again.

Rio’s early days with Sharon were a period of adjustment. Rio had to learn some manners. She would pull Sharon off balance whenever she saw a neighbor’s dog. Sharon had to teach Rio to stay with her no matter what. Even other pet owners needed some training! They adored Rio and often tried to give her treats. Sharon had to discourage them so that Rio would stay focused on her job.

Unfortunately, Rio has special dietary needs. She throws up when she eats regular dog food and needs expensive prescription food. When Sharon first got Rio, the light-colored dog with the build of a Labrador weighed only about 50 pounds. With the help of the right food, Rio returned to a healthy weight of 70 pounds. Thanks to Lincoln Animal Ambassadors, Sharon can afford the special food Rio requires.

Rio means everything to Sharon. She enables Sharon to go places that previously she couldn’t.  The two go everywhere together, from her building’s laundry room to a pond a few blocks from where Sharon lives. If Rio senses anything is wrong, she’ll start to whine. Aside from Sharon’s health needs, the two have a strong bond. Rio stays close to Sharon 24 hours a day. Throughout my phone call with Sharon, Rio lay at her feet and listened intently with her head cocked. She knew that Sharon was talking about her!

Sadly, a few months ago, Rio got injured. Sharon was taking her outside to use the bathroom when Rio got away from her. Although Rio quickly returned to Sharon, it was after this that Rio developed a limp in one of her hind legs. When Sharon took Rio to the vet, x-rays revealed that Rio had a torn Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL). Sharon is now trying to raise funds for surgery through a Go Fund Me page.

My thanks to Sharon, who kindly agreed to let me share her story. Every month, Lincoln Animal Ambassadors distributes an average of 3,000 pounds of food. When a client asks for a special needs diet or specific brand, Lincoln Animal Ambassadors does its best to oblige, even purchasing prescription pet food from veterinarians for recipients who otherwise couldn’t afford it. Sharon appreciates LAA’s support.

Lincoln Animal Ambassadors allows me to keep Rio. I couldn’t keep Rio without their help.–Sharon

How Lincoln Animal Ambassadors Helps Buddy

The pet food bank run by Lincoln Animal Ambassadors is a good place if you need dog food and can’t afford it.–Sharon

Every Monday and Thursday from 7 to 8 p.m., qualifying pet owners who qualify come to the Lincoln Animal Ambassadors food bank to get a month’s supply of free pet food, and sometimes other pet supplies. Sharon is one of those pet owners. She owns a lovable six-year-old male rat terrier named Buddy. Sharon heard about the pet food bank through word-of-mouth. Once a month, she receives a five-pound bag of dog food, canned food, and treats for Buddy. Sharon is thankful for the support that allows her to continue to care for Buddy. He follows her everywhere, and the two depend on one another.

Sharon is just one of about 230 recipients in 2017 to benefit from Lincoln Animal Ambassadors pet food bank. Volunteers are kept busy, serving between ten and fifteen clients during a typical night. In addition, during the Christmas season, the turnout may double, sometimes requiring clients to wait in line outside. Pet owners have frequently expressed heartfelt –and sometimes tearful–appreciation for the support the Lincoln Animal Ambassadors provides.

A bag of food can mean the difference of a pet living with their family or entering a shelter.–Pet Buddies Food Pantry

According to Pet Buddies Food Pantry, one out of six Americans live in poverty, with tens of millions of people living in poverty with pets. When those families are faced with the hard decision of giving up their pet, being able to turn to a pet food bank can make all the difference. Every year pet food banks not only help pets remain with their families, but they also ensure that desperate owners don’t harm their own health by sacrificing their meals for their pets. Pet food banks also help provide emotional relief to owners who can no provide for their pets. Some pet owners who are unable to afford both rent and pet food will choose homelessness rather than give up their pets. The bottom line is that if pets are family, you keep them with you even through the hard times, which is why pet food banks, like those operated by Lincoln Animal Ambassadors, are essential.

If you’re interested in helping, Lincoln Animal Ambassadors could use your assistance in both small and big ways. First, you can help spread the word about its services and needs. Says Ron Stowe, a volunteer with Lincoln Animal Ambassadors, “Word of mouth spreads our program. I’ve seen a noticeable increase in the amount of food we distribute, and an increase of people wanting to volunteer. All this has to mean something good is being done.”

Second, you can donate supplies to help the group support its current services. The Lincoln Animal Ambassador’s pet food bank relies on donations. Something that is very much needed, but typically doesn’t get donated, is cat litter.  Other accepted items are listed on Lincoln Animal Ambassadors’ website at Donate Pet Supplies. Summertime is a slow time for donations, when the food bank starts to run low. There are five local drop-off locations:

  • Petco North, 48th & O Street
  • Petco South, 56th & Highway 2
  • Super Saver, 27th & Cornhusker Highway
  • Super Saver, 56th & Highway 2
  • Matthew’s Episcopal Church, 2325 S. 24th St.

Third, you can donate money to help Lincoln Animal Ambassadors to serve the Lancaster area. Mary Douglas, president of Lincoln Animal Ambassadors, would like “to have support of the pet food bank by a Friends of the Pet Food Bank group, so that when we are low on canned food, or dry food, we could put the word out and that group would help out.”

Fourth, you can donate your time. Telephone interviewers are needed to process applications for the pet food bank. Volunteers are also needed to distribute food to clients on the nights that the food bank is open.

How Lincoln Animal Ambassadors Helps Tico Lovie

Tico Lovie wasn’t the dog that Lynn had expected to adopt. The one-year-old poodle had been brought to the Capital Humane Society after having been found wandering the streets of Crete, Nebraska. Lynn had been looking for a smaller dog but, when she saw the young dog hanging his head and in obvious emotional stress, her heart was filled with compassion. She’d wanted a dog in need of rescue, and Tico Lovie was certainly such a dog. Little did Lynn know at the time the challenges they would face together.

I don’t understand the people who are cruel to animals; they don’t do anything but be born.–Lynn

The initial challenges arose because of Tico Lovie’s trust issues. When Lynn first adopted him, he didn’t eat or drink enough, nor did he interact with people or play. Lynn worked with him to build his confidence. She pets him and rubs his back. She takes him for walks when the weather cooperates. Lynn has even tried to groom him; because he’s so fearful she hasn’t yet tried using a brush but instead strokes her fingers through his hair to keep the gnarls out. Lynn has also attempted to clip his nails. “The first time I tried I accidentally nipped his skin. He never even made a sound. That shows how bad he’s been abused.” Although Tico Lovie still backs away from strangers, he’s come a long way with Lynn. He now regularly drinks water and plays. Lynn is also teaching him to fetch. He sleeps with her on the couch (more comfortable to her because of back issues), he’s now confident enough to hold his head up.

I try to take him with me whenever I go out. He’s my life. I have very few friends.—Lynn

Through all her work with Tico Lovie, this little dog with brown ears and a short nose became Lynn’s faithful companion. When his poor appetite didn’t improve, she took him to the vet, where it was discovered that he had digestive problems that required prescription dog food. It’s also when Lynn ran into financial difficulties. Lynn had already been struggling to make ends meet on a limited income, to the point that she had gotten herself into credit card troubles. She turned to a debt-solution program for help, but then came Tico Lovie’s expensive prescription dog food. At age 74, finding regular work is tough, but Lynn prefers not to become dependent on government assistance. If all these dilemmas aren’t enough, Lynn has struggled with her own health.

God is faithful and He’ll take care of me. I live day by day.–Lynn

Still, when Tico Lovie got sick, something had to be done. When Lynn struggled to pay the vet bill, Animal Control assisted with finding her financial help. In addition, Animal Control advised her to apply to Lincoln Animal Ambassadors for help. Years ago, Lynn had heard about the Lincoln Animal Ambassadors food bank. At the time, although Lynn had thought it was a wonderful service to offer pet owners, she herself wasn’t in need of it and so had forgotten about it – until reminded about it by animal control. “When I found out that one could get pet food I applied and I’m so grateful for the help I’ve received. I know Lincoln Animal Ambassadors only has so much money, and is all run by volunteers, but I appreciate that they buy food from the vet office for me.” Because prescription food isn’t always readily available, Lincoln Animal Ambassadors orders it from local vets, and clients are able to confirm that it’s arrived before they pick it up.

Various pet food banks across the United States cite this startling statistic: financial hardship accounts for approximately 25% of the pets that are surrendered to shelters. Besides reducing the number of pets that end up being taken to overcrowded shelters, pet food banks also help provide emotional relief to owners who can’t provide for their pets.

It’s expensive to run a pet food bank. Even if everyone gives just a dollar, this would help.–Lynn

Every month, Lincoln Animal Ambassadors distributes an average of 5,000 pounds of food. Cat and dog food are the most often requested products, and each cat owner is offered a twenty-pound bag of litter. Sometimes a client will ask for a special needs diet or for a specific brand. Lincoln Animals Ambassadors does its best to oblige, even purchasing prescription pet food from veterinarians for recipients who otherwise couldn’t afford it. At times, there are requests for food for other animals too: birds, ferrets, guinea pigs, and even rats. If clients ask for items that haven’t been donated, Lincoln Animals Ambassadors may dip into its funds to buy them.

My thanks to Lynn, who kindly agreed to let me share her story as a way of paying back Lincoln Animals Ambassadors for their help Whenever she meets pet owners who have a need and who don’t know about Lincoln Animal Ambassadors, Lynn routinely recommends their services.

All You Ever Wanted to Know About LAA’s Pet Food Bank

Thirteen clients had scheduled a pick-up ahead of time. By the time I arrive, six of those appointments have already been kept. It’s 7:15 pm on a Thursday evening at Lincoln Animal Ambassador’s pet food bank, located at 4640 Bair Street. The physical location for the Pet Food Bank is donated by Dr. Otto of Superior Veterinary Care. I’m welcomed by four volunteers: Heather Bauer, Rod Bauer, Jake Jacobsen, Missy Groover. Immediately inside is a table where clients are checked in. Wall-to-wall are shelves stacked with a wide variety of pet supplies.

Various pet food banks across the United States cite this startling statistic: financial hardship accounts for approximately 25% of the pets that are surrendered to shelters. Besides reducing the number of pets that end up being taken to overcrowded shelters, pet food banks also help provide emotional relief to owners who aren’t able to provide for their pets. In this article, I’ll overview the operations of LAA’s pet food bank and I’ll introduce you to two people highly involved in ensuring it runs smoothly: Mary Douglas and Ron Stow.

Our group tried to think of what was needed in the community that wasn’t already there to help keep animals from going to the shelter. The pet food bank was born.—Mary Douglas

Origins of the Pet Food Bank

Inspired by a public meeting about reducing the euthanasia rate at the Capital Humane Society, Mary was one of the founding members in 2008 of the grass-roots group now well-recognized as Lincoln Animal Ambassadors. Her earliest tasks included helping to write LAA’s mission statement, determining the organization’s goals and, after LAA failed to make any headway through meetings with public officials, starting a food bank.

MaryDouglas_CroppedWhen I asked why she had accepted the role of coordinating LAA’s pet food bank, Mary laughed and explained that she didn’t “accept” the position. Instead Mary IS the person responsible for the food bank’s existence.” Mary began the food bank by drumming up a few donations of pet food and by operating services out of her garage. At one point, LAA has also run its operations out of the basement of the former Cat House, but this agreement ended when TCH moved. Now the pet food bank is located just off 33rd and Superior, in a space that is about fifteen feet by fifteen, enclosed by four hefty shelving units filled with food, leashes, toys, cat litter, flea, tick, and heartworm treatments.

To my naïve eyes, the pet food bank seems to be abundantly stocked. But then I learn that 2,000 pounds of food is given out every week, and I realize how quickly these shelves will empty. But fortunately the pet food bank has more supplies than I see before me; what doesn’t fit in this location are kept in two 10×10 storage units.

Pet Food Bank Operations

The food bank officially opens at 7:00 pm and closes at 8:00 pm on Mondays and Thursdays, but clients have been known to come before and after those times. A volunteer with a list of applicants in hand will greet clients as they arrive. Clients are asked to show identification and photos of each of the pets whom they’re picking up food for. Sometimes they’ll need to also fill out a short or long application form, if one or the other hasn’t been already completed. Once paperwork is processed, volunteers set to work picking out requested supplies. While food and other items are loaded onto a rolling cart, the clients might browse cartons on shelves to find toys or other goodies for their pet(s). Clients may apply once a month to the pet food bank, so the goal is to provide enough food to last thirty days.

LAA relies on donations. The most often requested products are dog and cat food. Every cat owner is offered a twenty-pound bag of litter. Sometimes a client will ask for a special needs diet or for a specific brand. Volunteers do their best to oblige, but options are sometimes limited.  At times, there are requests for food for other animals too: birds, ferrets, guinea pigs, and even rats. The most popular donations are dog food, followed by cat food, and then toys. If clients ask for items that haven’t been donated, LAA may dip into its funds to purchase and provide.

From the start, Mary has maintained her position as coordinator, although her other duties have evolved. When the president of LAA stepped down, the board approached Mary. “I wanted the organization to succeed and knew it wouldn’t if I didn’t step in. There was no one else that wanted that role. It takes a good deal of time because everything that happens–events, pet food bank, spay/neuter, vaccination clinic, new ventures the group takes on—the president is involved in all of them.”

I suppose it wasn’t as much inspiration as a conspiracy between Donna and Mary to get me to get started at the pet food bank—hog-tied, kickin’, and screamin’!—Ron Stow

Four years ago, Ron Stow first got involved with LAA’s pet food bank by helping with loading and unloading of donations. Although his official title is “warehouse manager/Monday night distribution,” Ron jokingly refers to his duties as “throwing around a bunch of pet food”. And, despite the tongue-in-cheek quote, in all seriousness he enjoys his work because “I realize what a difference we make in peoples’ lives.”

I’ve probably put on an inch or two in the arms and shoulders tossing 50-pound bags of food.—Ron Stow

Both Ron and May bring unique qualifications to their roles with the pet food bank. Mary has been involved with animal rescue for about 15 years. She also possesses the attitude that LAA doesn’t want to do anything that will compete with other local animal welfare groups. “We like to collaborate and feel we can get more done working together.” As for Ron, who has been an avionics mechanic in the Air Force and a mechanic at home, he’s simply “trying to fill in where there seemed to be a need”.

What qualifies me for throwing 50-pound bags of food around?  Well, I went to the gym in my younger days. —Ron Stow

Memorable Food Bank Moments

Mary and Ron have had their share of memorable moments with the pet food bank. In fact, Mary has so many that she found it impossible to pinpoint just one. Instead she expressed happiness over having a lot of really grateful pet food bank participants, as well as abundant support from the community for animal organizations such as LAA. “I am just so grateful that we have great community support–because none of it would happen without it.”

Unfortunately, there will also be bittersweet moments. Mary told about the time when LAA helped get a great Dane spayed for a gentleman who lived in a camper by the lake. The soft-spoken owner, who loved his dog tremendously, came to Tails and Trails specifically to see LAA to get his dog signed up to get spayed. LAA got him set up right away. Sadly, about a year after that, LAA heard that his dog had developed incurable auto-immune disease. “He’d gotten a job by that time and was getting back on his feet, and he lost her.”

Another situation involved a pet food bank recipient who was homeless and living in his truck with his three dogs. Because he wouldn’t give them up, he couldn’t get into a homeless shelter.  LAA members tracked down his estranged family and an outreach caseworker who knew him, and they worked together to get him and his dogs into an apartment that he could afford with his disability payments. “We continue to help him with food. That was certainly a collaboration of minds in that situation.”

RonStoweRon also has experienced many memorable moments. One that he’ll never forget involves a gentleman by the name of Mr. Okra. “We had our military ball caps on.  He was in the Korean War, and I was in Desert Storm.  We were sitting on the loading dock of the old place, relating where each had been, and had been doing so for about 30 minutes.  Mrs. Okra was getting a little impatient with our B.S. session and stepped out of the car and said, ‘When are you two gonna quit jack-jawin’ and take me home?’ His response was priceless: ‘Uh-oh, I’m in trouble!’ Sadly, Mr. Okra passed away a few months later.”

During my visit to LAA’s pet food bank, volunteers shared other stories. They told about people who take the bus across town to pick up food that they would carry home in a backpack. They also told of a client who rode a bike 18 blocks in 100 degree heat to pick up supplies. “Now that’s dedication!” And then there’s a lady who from the moment she would walk in to the moment she left, she said thank you. “These people make it worthwhile.”

We’re an all-volunteer group and can’t continue our programs without volunteers to help. LAA is a family… We’re all in this together.—Mary Douglas

As you might surmise, there’s much to be gained from being involved with LAA. You’ll form relationships in working with other volunteers and/or assisting with clients. LAA is a great way to combat pet overpopulation and to allow people to keep their pets that otherwise might not be able to afford to.

Our mission is not glamorous. We don’t have fuzzy kittens and puppies to adopt out. We try to prevent those. But we feel that our mission, that of keeping pets in their homes and of spaying and neutering to prevent unwanted litters, is addressing the root causes of animal homelessness. We cannot adopt our way out of the numbers of animals going into shelters.  We have to be preventative.—Mary Douglas

How You Can Help

If you’re interested in helping out, LAA could use your assistance in both small and big ways. First, you can help spread the word about the services it offers. Says Mary, “When someone is in need of the pet food bank, give them our phone number or our e-mail address. Spread the word why it’s important to spay and neuter your pets. And, if there’s a group that would benefit from a presentation from our group, let us know.” Ron concurs, noting that, “Word of mouth spreads our program.  I have seen a noticeable increase in the amount of food we distribute, and an increase of people wanting to volunteer.  All this has to mean something good is being done.”

Second, you can donate supplies to help the group support its current services. As I mentioned earlier, LAA’s pet food bank relies on donations. While some of these come from stores and manufacturers with a surplus, others come from local animal groups such as the Capital Humane Society and from average animal lovers like you and me. Something that is very much needed, but typically doesn’t get donated is cat litter.  Other accepted items are listed at: Donate Pet Supplies. Summertime is also a slow time for donations, when the food bank starts to run low. There are five drop-off locations:

  • Petco North, 48th & O Street, Lincoln, NE
  • Petco South, 56th & Highway 2, Lincoln, NE
  • Super Saver, 27th & Cornhusker Highway, Lincoln, NE
  • Super Saver, 56th & Highway 2, Lincoln, NE
  • St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church, 2325 S. 24th St., Lincoln, NE

Third, you can donate money to help LAA to expand. Mary looks forward to the day when the group will “have a location that we could rent at a very low cost (or even free/shared space as the group once had), about 600 – 900 square feet where we could store our food and other pet items to distribute from the same location.” With such a facility, LAA could more easily store donations and provide quicker service to even more clients. She’d also like “to have support of the pet food bank by a Friends of the Pet Food Bank group, so that when we are low on canned food, or dry food, we could put the word  out and that group would help out.” As for Ron, he’d like to see LAA’s pet food bank “work with Meals on Wheels to help out more of the needy, like our weekly distributions do.

Fourth, you can donate your time. Telephone interviewers are needed to process applications for the pet food bank. Volunteers are also needed to distribute food to clients on the nights that the food bank is open. The average turnout on any given night at the food bank is between ten to fifteen clients, which can keep volunteers busy for their entire scheduled hour. In addition, during the Christmas season, numbers have been as high as thirty, with clients waiting in a line outside. “Holidays are a hard time.”

Interested? This position and many of LAA’s other volunteer positions are described on the volunteer application page: What You Can Do. Applicants will be contacted by an LAA volunteer. All volunteers will be asked to attend one of its pet food bank distributions as an orientation to LAA.

Mary Douglas remains solidly entrenched in animal welfare. Like Pauline, whom I featured last week, she continues to volunteer at Hearts United for Animals, and has taken on the responsibility of performing home visits and transporting animals. In addition, as you might expect, she has her own pets. Both dogs are seniors and one has special needs.

Ron Stowe loves their pets. His family has three dogs and three cats. He’s their primary caretaker and takes pains to make sure they’re well taken care of and comfortable.

I’d like to thank Mary and Ron for their willingness for me to interview them. Also, I want to give a special thanks to other LAA pet food bank volunteers who graciously answered my many, many, many questions about the pet food bank and shared stories of their experiences. Next week, I’ll be back to share with about LAA’s humane education services.

 

What Lincoln Animal Ambassadors Does

Lincoln Animal Ambassadors is a well-known local animal welfare group, but what exactly do they do? They don’t rescue dogs from puppy mills or high-kill shelters. They don’t rehabilitate emaciated pets. They don’t offer adorable puppies and kittens for adoption. Yet Lincoln Animal Ambassadors provides essential services to the Lancaster County pet community as part of its mission to “address the root cause of animal homelessness”. In this article, I’ll describe the group’s services.

One service offered by LAA is a low-cost spay/neuter program for those residing in Lancaster County who are unable to pay the full cost of altering their pet. Spaying and neutering reduces the risk of cancer in both males and females. It also curbs undesirable behaviors such as aggression and the insatiable desire to seek attention from the opposite sex. Just as important, according to animal welfare experts, spaying and neutering is one of the best ways to curb pet overpopulation. And when one looks at the numbers, we clearly have an issue. To cite just two stats: 2.4 million dogs and cats are euthanized each year as a result of overpopulation. In addition, there are estimated 70 million homeless dogs and cats. By making spay/neuter more affordable, LAA makes these benefits more accessible.

How can you take advantage of LAA’s low-cost spay/neuter program? To have your name added to the low cost spay/neuter program wait list, complete the form at LAA’s website or leave a message at 402-817-1168. A LAA volunteer will return your call. A short phone interview will be conducted to obtain information for completing a voucher, which includes determining what veterinarian clinic from a select list you intend to use. The voucher will be issued to both you and the selected veterinarian clinic during the interview. Once you receive the voucher, the responsibility will fall on you to schedule a vet appointment and to take your pet to it. The amount you’ll pay to have your pet spayed/neutered will depend on what you can afford. The difference is covered by donations, fundraisers, and grants.

Low-Cost Spay/Neuter Application

Another service offered by LAA is a pet food bank for those residing in Lancaster County who are in need of temporary help in caring for their pets. This service helps provide relief to the emotional stress of owners who aren’t able to provide for their pets. It also reduces the number of pets that end up being taken to already overcrowded shelters. One study ranked cost as the fourth most common reason for pet relinquishment. In addition, numerous pet food bank sites cite this startling statistic: financial hardship accounts for approximately 25% of the pets that are surrendered to shelters.

Companion animals and their people often rely on each other for their mental and physical well-being, so this program helps prevent the trauma that results for both the pets and their people, when they cannot afford to feed, care for or keep their pets.

How can you take advantage of LAA’s pet food bank program? To have your name added to the pet food program, complete the form at LAA’s website or leave a message at 402-817-1168. You’ll need to agree to participate in LAA’s low-cost spay/neuter program if your pet(s) are unaltered, as well as showing proof of financial need. For those receiving WIC, Medicaid, or food stamps, provide a statement of qualifying benefit period. Others can prove financial need by documenting all earned and unearned income, including: paycheck stubs for the past month, child support or unemployment compensation benefits, and/or a copy of last year’s income tax form. (More details can be found on the LAA website by clicking the link provided below.) LAA’s Pet Food Pickup location is 4640 Bair Avenue. Days and times for pickup may vary according to volunteer availability. When you pick up pet food, which can be for multiple pets, you’ll need to show a current driver’s license. A household can receive pet food once every thirty days. The food bank is supported solely by donations, fundraisers, and grants. This means assistance is NOT guaranteed, is on a case-by-case basis, and is only temporary.

Pet Food Bank Application

Another service offered by LAA is a low-cost shot clinic. This service helps brings affordable pet care to families. Although offerings vary based on location, options for care might include vaccinations and heartworm and flea prevention. Vaccinations are essential for protecting pets from contagious diseases. Preventing heartworm and fleas is easier than treatment after the fact, and according to the American Heartworm Association “prevention is the only means of protecting cats from the effects of heartworm disease”.

How can you take advantage of LAA’s low-cost shot clinic? Clinic locations, hours, and offerings are listed at LAA’s website. No appointments are necessary. No exam fees are charged. Some of the clinics provide free health check for any pets that receive vaccinations and offer reduced costs for other services, such as allergy shots, ear cleaning, nail trimming, and expressing of anal glands.


LAA_Stats

Low-Cost Shot Clinics

The final service of LAA is education. LAA is committed to “creating positive change for local companion animals, and we firmly believe that change comes through education.” As such, LAA offers both presentations and educational materials on responsible pet ownership, basic behavior training, the importance and benefits of spay/neuter, and other topics. On a weekly basis, you can also find informative and human interest articles right here at LAA Pet Talk.

When I started blogging for Lincoln Animal Ambassadors almost two years ago, I have to admit that I knew little about the group’s services. I simply wanted to use my creative talents to help animals. As I learned more about LAA’s services, I grew proud of my involvement with the group. Please follow LAA Pet Talk over the next month as I introduce you to some of the wonderful people who make this vital community group thrive. And, on May 26, please support all the valuable services that LAA provides by donating to LAA as part of Give to Lincoln Day.

SPAY/NEUTER ARTICLES